Easter Eggs 3 Ways

 chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

By now I think it’s well known I love a good DIY, and Easter is no different. I wanted to try doing naturally dyed eggs at home, plus a few other simple ideas for decorating eggs: chalk paint and glitter- covered eggs. I thought a variety would be fun plus Ari loved the chance to help decorate them. The chalk paint and glitter eggs are quick and simple to make, but I’ve provided info on how we did the natural dye eggs since there was a little more involved with them. 

I’ve been eyeing up the naturally dyed Easter eggs that I’ve seen others share about and finally thought I’d try making them this year with Ari at home. I’ll admit that it takes a little while to make the natural dyes and you’ll want to put down some paper to avoid spills/ stains, but it’s fun to try and Ari had a blast. For some other fun Easter ideas scroll to the end of this post to see the Easter party I teamed up on with Creative Wife & Joyful Worker (where you’ll find her DIY for making those gold foil eggs) and Discovering Parenthood.

NATURAL DYE EGGS

natural homemade Easter egg dye

Making the dye for all 4 colours of eggs starts with the same mixture of ingredients + whatever additive is needed to create the colour. 

For the dye base:

4 cups water

2 tbsp white vinegar

1 tsp salt

For pink eggs- 4 cups roughly chopped beets

For yellow eggs- 4 tbsp ground tumeric

For green eggs-  6 cups spinach, chopped + 1 tbsp ground tumeric 

For blue eggs-  4 cups red cabbage, chopped

natural homemade Easter egg dye

natural homemade Easter egg dye

Directions:

  1. Combine water, vinegar, and salt in a large pot, followed by the dye ingredient for the colour you want to make. 
  2. Bring to a boil, then simmer for half an hour uncovered. 
  3. Strain the dye liquid from the solid ingredient (for the tumeric used for the yellow and green dye you can use cheesecloth to help strain). Transfer to a large canning jar or other container to cool. Repeat until you have all of the dyes for the colours you want to make (I added some of the tumeric dye for yellow eggs to the green dye mixture because I didn’t think the green dye from the spinach would turn out. I’m glad I added it because the eggs turned out really green). 
  4. Once the liquid has cooled, submerge your eggs and leave over night in the fridge.

Tip: I’d suggest using hard boiled eggs, since they sink and will absorb the dye equally over the whole shell surface. We tried using artificial white eggs plus hard boiled brown and white eggs to see how they would turn out. The artificial eggs didn’t absorb the dye as well and came out more pastel (which is still pretty, just might not be the result you want), plus I found it was easy to wipe the dye off of them after we took them out of the jars, so the coverage wasn’t as nice/ even. I like the artificial eggs more for the other two styles of eggs I made- chalk paint and glitter- covered. 

 

natural homemade Easter egg dye

CHALK PAINT EGGS

chalk paint Easter eggs

Materials:

Eggs (we used the artificial eggs left over from the natural dye batch and I liked how they worked for this)

Chalk paint in various colours

Sponge brush

Directions:

chalk paint Easter eggs

  1. Using a sponge brush, paint one half of each egg (either top or bottom) and allow to dry in an egg carton. Flip and repeat.
  2. Apply a second coat if needed (I found the second coat gave nice coverage)

chalk paint Easter eggs

GLITTER EGGS

chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

Materials:

Eggs (we added glitter to some of the chalk paint eggs, but I love the idea of doing this with plain white eggs as well)

Liquid glue or mod podge

Glitter

Sponge brush

Directions:

chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

  1. Using a sponge brush, coat one half of the egg in glue and sprinkle glitter over top and allow to dry in an egg carton. Flip and repeat.
  2. Tap loose glitter to remove. If you want to avoid glitter getting everywhere, add a second coat of glue or mod podge over top to seal the glitter.

chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

 Like I said, I love the chance to make a mess and get a little crafty. I guess it’s about that time to start adding some Spring and Easter decor around the house and these eggs are perfect for that (but I’d maybe just stick with the artificial eggs if they’re going to be used for more than a day or two 😉 ). They’re pretty displayed in glass jars and vases or scattered on your table for Easter dinner. See the photos below for some ideas of how to style an Easter table/ party and the links to the other Easter projects included in the Easter collab with Creative Wife and Joyful Worker and Discovering Parenthood

  chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs 

chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

chalk paint and glitter Easter eggs

Easter party

Easter party

Easter party 

Easter party

For other fun Easter ideas see these posts from our Easter collab:

Geo Floral Easter Party Decor– Creative Wife and Joyful Worker 

A Little Floral Easter Party– Discovering Parenthood

DIY Kid’s Carrot Love Ducks Snack– Discovering Parenthood

DIY Gold Foil Easter Eggs– Creative Wife and Joyful Worker 

DIY Floral Kid’s Bunny Ears– Discovering Parenthood (blog post link coming soon).

DIY Watercolour Easter Egg Banner- Creative Wife and Joyful Worker (blog post link coming soon)

Photos:

DIY photos: OHP

Styled party photos- Creative Wife and Joyful Worker and Discovering Parenthood

Location- Ritual Icecream in Fort Langley

Raspberry Cheesecake Icecream + dishes- Ritual Icecream

Kid’s Clothes- Watermelon Tree Kids in Fort Langley

Outfit Styling- Creative Wife and Joyful Worker

Floral Table Runner- Sequel Events

Bunny Rabbit Floral Cake- The Cake Mama

Geometric and Floral Name Cookies: The Cake Mama

Geometric Party Plates, Blush Tablecloth, Wooden Forks: Joonie and Joe

Easter Egg Macarons: Sugar Patisserie

Dairy Free Easter Basket

Easter & chocolate just seem to go hand in hand. But if your family is like ours & has to skip the chocolate in the Easter egg hunt it can be tricky to think of ideas to put in a dairy free Easter basket. Because I don’t want my 21 month old completely hocked up on sugar I wanted our Easter basket & egg hunt to not only be dairy free but not stuffed to the brim with other sweet confections (see my idea for moolah below- Ari loves putting coins in her piggy bank & it’s so cute to watch, so this is as much for my enjoyment as it is hers) ;). Since I don’t think I’m the only parent thinking this way I thought I’d share 3 ideas for a fun dairy free Easter basket (I’m prepped a little early this year since #2 is due right around Easter weekend).
                    

 1. $$$ for their piggy bank 
What kid doesn’t love a little moolah? Plus it’s a great way to use up loose change. Pop a few coins in each plastic egg for a fun Easter egg hunt idea                                        
2. Marshmallows or another sweet treat 
Peeps might be the classic choice but I love that these gourmet chick mallows are made with honey instead of corn syrup & there are plenty of dairy- free candy options out there. Just pick ones your kids love & are age- appropriate        
 3. Activity kit 
As a fun little gift to unwrap, why not give your kiddo something you can do together? A craft kit or something Spring- themes are great inexpensive ideas
#Shoplocal Where to Buy:
Honey- sweetened gourmet marshmallows- WHIPPED Baked Goods & Confectionary 
‘My Little Box of Gardening’ Kit- Local garden centre (I’ve seen these at a few stores)
(also see herehere, and here for some other fun craft/ activity ideas from 2 companies I like)
Bunny ears (for my little Easter bunny to wear on her egg hunt)- Cutie Pie Boutique
Have a Happy Easter!

March posts sponsored by Little Dreamers Consulting

Wooden Easter Egg DIY with Natural Earth Paint

A few weeks back I shared this post featuring Natural Earth Paint and their Petite Children’s Earth Paint Kit. We had a fun, messy, art- filled afternoon trying out their natural, non- toxic, & eco- friendly paints and I’m glad to have found a company that offers quality art supplies that are chemical free (I love DIY & artsy activities, but don’t want to worry about what’s in the products being used, especially with a toddler who inevitably will end up with her fingers in her mouth 😉 ). 
With Easter just around the corner I wanted to share a fun DIY that’s a twist on a classic: dying eggs. 
We’re all familiar with the dye kits you can get at the grocery store complete with vibrant dye pellets. Growing up, it was something I always looked forward to at Easter time, and I remember my Mum trying different tactics to make the eggs last more than a day; we usually hard- boiled them, and one year we even hollowed some raw eggs with a needle. But sadly eggs only stay good for a few days before you have to chuck ’em out, and I was always sad to see my Easter project go in the garbage (inevitably the fragile hollowed- out eggs suffered the same fate, since they were so delicate and got cracked). Plus I’m not sure about what goes into those dyes, and I’m not too excited about how they stain fingers, clothes, and any unprotected surfaces. Since this is Ari’s first Easter where she’ll be able to enjoy some of the crafts and Easter egg hunts, I wanted to find a toddler- friendly DIY we could enjoy that wouldn’t end up in the trash. Enter wooden Easter eggs!  
Natural Earth Paint offers a kit including 6 2″ wooden eggs plus 6 colours of Earth Paint (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, & white) that you can decorate and keep long after Easter is over (I think they’d also make cute Christmas tree decorations, just add a string/ ribbon). I thought this was a fun alternative to the traditional dye kits, and since they’re wood you don’t have to worry about little hands having to be fragile with them.

Here’s what the wooden egg kit looks like:

I couldn’t wait to have another artsy afternoon with Ari and make a big mess. For the paints, I mixed them up in a cupcake container so they wouldn’t spill as easily (plus it worked as a place to chorale the eggs & for drying after), popped some paint brushes on the table and let them at it (to see what the paint colours look like before and after mixing them up, check out my post featuring the Petitie Children’s Paint Kit here). 
I invited one of my girlfriends over with her little man to join in the fun and it was hilarious helping these two bumpkins decorate their first Easter eggs.We opted to let the kids paint in just their diapers to avoid any extra messes and since paint got everywhere this was a good decision (Ari decided her tummy was an excellent canvas 😉 ).  
Let the fun begin!
 

Easter fun in progress!

…And the finished product!

When the kids were finished with painting, the clean up was as simple as wiping everything down with soap and warm water, no staining and no scrubbing necessary (except for Ari who needed a post- DIY bath to wash her now- blue belly button!). I love that we’ll have these eggs for as long as we want to keep them, and can redecorate them every year if we want. It will also be cute to see how Ari decorates them each year as she grows up. If you’ve been looking for a fun Easter DIY to do with your kids, this kit is a great idea. Thank you to Natural Earth Paint for giving us two enjoyable afternoons filled with artsy, DIY fun! 

Natural Earth Paint offers a variety of other natural art supplies for kids in their Eco Kids product line- including paint kits and face paint- and fine art supplies for adults.

To learn more about Natural Earth Paint & to order your own wooden egg kit, visit their website & find them on Facebook & Twitter. 

Product featured in this post:
Wooden Eggs Craft Kit- $15.95 USD
Product Features:
Sustainable FSC certified wood from the Pacific Northwest
100% non- toxic tempura- style paint

Disclosure: I received free product in exchange for this review. All opinions are my own.


Photos by K Petrunia; logo courtesy of Natural Earth Paint

March posts sponsored by Little Dreamers Consulting

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